Honest Joe

Good ole Joe. Honest Joe.

That’s it.

That’s all the blog post.

Let me elaborate on that some more.

Former Vice President Joe Biden is honest in his statements, yes we can recognise he has made some misleading or false claims here and there but, when your opponent has made 13,435 false or misleading claims way before he even had 1000th in office, the bar is not that high.

Unless you are Paulette Dale, who loves President Donald Trump’s smile– Wait, she’s voting for Biden?!

Wow, who could have guessed it? Telling lies doesn’t help, imagine that.

Jokes aside, let us look at the numbers, shall we?

By American voters, Democratic candidate Joe Biden is seen as more honest, more even-tempered, and a better role model than US President Donald Trump.

On a poll conducted June 16-22 by Pew Research Centre among 4,708 adults, including 3,577 registered voters, found overall headline figures of 54% of registered voters who said that if the election were held today, they would vote for Biden or lean toward voting for him, putting him ten points ahead of Trump, who was backed by 44%.

So you could say Trump is LIE-ing low in the polls. No? Okay.

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The Economy & The Election

President Donald Trump and former Vice President Joe Biden laid out starkly divergent visions of how to dig the U.S. economy out of the deepest downturn since the Great Depression amid the COVID-19 pandemic.

The goal of the next president will be to get back to full employment as fast as possible

  • Trump promised more cuts to taxes and regulations, and he dangled the prospect of additional tariffs against China; “We will go right after China,” Trump said. “We will not rely on them one bit. We’re taking our business out of China. We are bringing it home. We want our business to come home.” He added, “We will continue to reduce taxes and regulations at levels not seen before.”
  • Biden Biden vowed to raise taxes on the wealthy and corporations and use the money to spend trillions to upgrade the nation’s infrastructure and shift to a clean-energy future, make housing and child care more affordable and improve education, among other proposals.
  • Trump In his nomination speech, he suggested he’ll propose cutting individual taxes but didn’t say which. Trump’s campaign has generally provided vague economic proposals that could be fleshed out later. The president, for example, vowed to create 10 million jobs in 10 months but didn’t specify how.
    Economist Chris Edwards of the libertarian Cato Institute says: “Trump will be better from a free-market perspective.”
    The Tax Foundation says it’s difficult to analyze the ideas without more details.
    Critics question the legality of a payroll tax cut that’s not approved by Congress.
    “Tax cuts provide a small economic bang for the buck, adding significantly to the nation’s debt load and providing little economic lift.“ said Mark Zandi, chief economist of Moody’s Analytics
  • Biden His administration would raise taxes and eliminate loopholes for individuals earning more than $400,000.
    Economist Nancy Vanden Houten of Oxford Economics says she supports the plan because it targets wealthy individuals who likely would save, rather than spend, their tax windfall, doing relatively little harm to the economy.
  • Trump is trusted more than Democratic nominee Joe Biden to handle the economy, polls show, even with more than 40 million Americans filing jobless claims and growth stalled due to the coronavirus pandemic.
  • Biden, who has held online events from home during the shutdown, should be out in communities across the country demonstrating how to reopen businesses while following public health guidance. He needs to show what life is going to be like and how we are going to do it.
  • Trump has staked his political future on the economy, pushing a return to normal. An improving economy could play to Trump’s strengths, said Ian Sams, an adviser at Navigator, a polling organization.
  • A Biden adviser said re-opening should be dictated by public health concerns and that phased approaches being done by most states make sense. “From an economic standpoint, the worst-case scenario would be opening up and having to shut down again,” the adviser said.
    Economists see a recovery beginning in the third quarter, with job gains expected at more than 2 million, according to a Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia survey. But those forecasters still see a double-digit unemployment rate by the November election. “The unemployment rate will probably be falling relatively quickly later this year and next year, but it’s still going to be at a very high level,” the Biden adviser said.
    “It’s not that we don’t want to reopen the economy,” prominent Michigan Democrat, Vaughn Derderian, the chair of the Oakland County Democratic Party said. “We don’t know what it means to reopen the economy safely.”

A badly flagging economy of course works more to Biden’s political favor than Trump’s. But it’s also possible that the economy will simply matter less in this election than in past presidential contests.

The economy has gone into recession, unemployment is at 11.1%, and record numbers of new COVID-19 cases could substantially boost unemployment yet again. Come November, the economy could be a strong headwind for the incumbent president.

The election is determined on the margins, in other words. Plenty of people know how they’ll vote, regardless of their income or even whether they have a job on Election Day. But for those people in swing states without strong party affiliations, the economy could nudge their voting decisions one way or the other.

Bottom line,  the economy will play a determining factor in the election.

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