Pandemic Eviction

Yes, that is and thing and it is happening during a time where every single health authority and official, advice is to stay home. A growing number of people are being forced out of where they live because they can’t pay the rent.

Because being stressed about catching Covid-19 and losing your job is not enough, you have to be stressed about getting evicted and since that’s not hard enough on its own, you could be getting evicted during a pandemic too.

There is a new eviction ban being enacted through the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The goal is to stem the spread of the COVID-19 outbreak, which the agency says in its order “presents a historic threat to public health.”

Housing advocates and landlord groups both have been warning that millions of people could soon be put out of their homes through eviction if Congress does not do more to help renters and landlords and reinstate expanded unemployment benefits

“While an eviction moratorium is an essential step, it is a half-measure that extends a financial cliff for renters to fall off of when the moratorium expires and back rent is owed.” says Diane Yentel, CEO of the National Low Income Housing Coalition.

Landlords are worried about falling off a cliff too. Doug Bibby is the president of the National Multifamily Housing Council. He says, “An eviction moratorium will ultimately harm the very people it aims to help by making it impossible for housing providers, particularly small owners, to meet their financial obligations and continue to provide shelter to their residents”

Evictions for reasons other than nonpayment of rent will be allowed. The government says it will impose criminal penalties on landlords who violate the ban.

The bottom line here is, we need legislation with funding that helps both renters and landlords, because when Covid-19 is over (and I sincerely hope it will be over, and becomes a thing of the pass at some point) the rent will be due, and you will either be a renter with a huge amount due, or a landlord with an empty property and with very few people able to afford a roof above their heads

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Coronavirus USA

The daily confirmed Covid-19 (Coronavirus) cases, today Oct. 6th 2020, is of 40.705.
This is the current number of Covid-19 cases by state, starting with the highest:

#StateConfirmed Cases#StateConfirmed Cases
1California835,97126Iowa93,448
2Texas809,56027Oklahoma91,982
3Florida720,12528Arkansas87,430
4New York500,41529Nevada82,437
5Georgia323,71430Utah78,723
6Illinois306,13331Colorado73,537
7Arizona221,93432Kentucky73,158
8Nort Carolina219,75433Kansas63,580
9New Jersey212,56434Connecticut59,120
10Tennessee203,69935Nebraska48,259
11Pennsylvania169,66436Idaho44,422
12Louisiana168,51237Oregon35,049
13Alabama160,47738New Mexico30,632
14Ohio160,03039Rhode Island25,596
15Virginia153,18240South Dakota24,598
16South Carolina152,15941North Dakota24,364
17Michigan142,72642Delaware21,466
18Missouri138,43243West Virginia16,936
19Massachussetts135,46244District Of Columbia15,652
20Wisconsin134,35945Montana14,847
21Maryland128,20446Hawaii12,854
22Indiana125,97647New Hampshire8,680
23Minnesota104,79948Alaska8,613
24Mississippi100,70349Wyoming6,629
25Washington94,09450Maine5,565
51Vermont1,821
Source: worldometers.info/

These numbers give a grim perspective, I can tell you that in each the state the number of cases that made a full recovery is more than 50% and yes, the death toll is high, yet the percentage of deaths is very low; take California for example, the total number of deaths is 16,178 and that amounts for approximately around 1.9% of the confirmed cases.

I agree that number of deaths should be 0, but we can’t all be Vermont that up to this date has had less than 2000 confirmed cases: I’d love for Vermont to have a super neat trick or secret to keep that number so low but they just did the standards like frequent hand-washing, mask-wearing and social distancing

Yes, it is that simple!

Unless you ask President Donald Trump, who until now has given some pretty misleading information, such as:

  • On the Nature of the Outbreak: The outbreak would be temporary: “It’s going to disappear. One day, it’s like a miracle—it will disappear.” This is the one I wish were true, but sadly it isn’t. Anthony Fauci, the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, warned days later that he was concerned that “as the next week or two or three go by, we’re going to see a lot more community-related cases.” He was right—the virus has not disappeared.
  • Blaming the Obama Administration: The Trump White House “inherited” a “broken,” “bad,” and “obsolete” test for the coronavirus. The novel coronavirus did not exist in humans during the Obama administration. Public-health experts agree that, because of that fact, the CDC could not have produced a test, and thus a new test had to be developed this year.
  • On Coronavirus Testing: “Anybody that needs a test, gets a test. We—they’re there. They have the tests. And the tests are beautiful” and “If somebody wants to be tested right now, they’ll be able to be tested.” Trump made these two claims two months apart, but the truth was the same both times: The U.S. did not have enough testing.
  • On COVID-19 Treatments and Vaccines: Trump was being “sarcastic” when he suggested in a briefing on April 23 that his medical experts should research the use of powerful light and injected disinfectants to treat COVID-19. Trump’s tone did not seem sarcastic when he made the apparent suggestion to inject disinfectants. Turning to Birx and a Department of Homeland Security science-and-technology official, he mused: “I see the disinfectant, where it knocks it out in a minute. One minute. And is there a way we can do something like that, by injection inside or almost a cleaning? … It would be interesting to check that.” When he walked this statement back the next day, he added that he was only asking his experts “to look into whether or not sun and disinfectant on the hands [work].” [PLEASE DO NOT DRINK OR INJECT BLEACH OR DISINFECTANTS]

Also, North Dakota.
What’s going on there?
Covid-19 hospitalizations in North Dakota have hit a new high, the state Department of Health reported Monday.

We are not experts on the matter to be given out recommendations, but we can quote the experts:

In an interview with “Andrea Mitchell Reports” on MSNBC, Dr. Fauci addressed when people would most likely be able to do things again that they had done before the pandemic, such as going to an indoor movie theater “with impunity.”
While a vaccine may be available by the end of the year, he said, “by the time you mobilize the distribution of the vaccinations, and you get the majority or more of the population vaccinated and protected, that’s likely not going to happen till the mid or end of 2021.”
In a panel discussion at Harvard Medical School he said “we need to hunker down and get through this fall and winter because it’s not going to be easy.” Ms. Mitchell pointed out that this conflicted with what President Trump had said at the White House on the same day, that the country had “rounded the final turn” on the virus.
He said “what we don’t want to see is going into the fall season when people will be spending more time indoors — and that’s not good for a respiratory borne virus — you don’t want to start off already with a baseline that’s so high.”

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has updated its website to warn that the coronavirus can spread through the air, something public health experts have been warning about for months but went unacknowledged by the agency until Monday.
“There is evidence that under certain conditions, people with COVID-19 seem to have infected others who were more than 6 feet away,” the CDC says on its website.

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Legislative Impact of Coronavirus

California voters can enact their own laws outside of the state Legislature by putting initiatives up for a public vote. To qualify for the ballot, proposed laws must get signatures of at least 5% (623,212 signatures) of voters who cast ballots in the previous election for governor. Supporters say they collected 900,000 signatures.

Fallout from the coronavirus pandemic has delayed by two years what likely would have been one of the most expensive California ballot battles leading up to this November’s election, initiative supporters said Thursday.

The proposal would raise the limit for damages for pain and suffering in medical malpractice lawsuits from the $250,000 cap set in 1975, to now tie the cap to inflation, increasing it to about $1.2 million.

Proponents will delay the campaign until 2022 because of the uncertainty prompted by the pandemic, Jamie Court, president of the advocacy group Consumer Watchdog, said in an emailed statement.

Two-thirds of voters in 2014 rejected a similar proposal after a coalition of medical groups raised nearly $60 million to defeat it. They argued that increasing lawsuit awards would have raised health care prices for everyone.

“Voters are overwhelmed with trying to keep their families safe and deal with the economic impacts of COVID-19” Consumer Watchdog board member Scott Olsen, said in a statement.

The cap is also being challenged as unconstitutional in an Alameda County Superior Court lawsuit.

Supporters say the cap disproportionately impacts people of color, citing a study from the Brookings Institute saying babies of well-educated Black mothers are more likely to die before their first birthday than babies of white mothers with less than a high school education.

“It’s unfortunate that while California’s health providers are courageously working on the front lines of this pandemic, a few opportunistic trial lawyers have remained focused on a ballot measure that would substantially increase the burden on California’s doctors and clinics while inflating health care costs for everyone,” said Lisa Maas, executive director of Californians Allied for Patient Protection, which opposes the measure.

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Flashback: American Workers, Families, and Employers Assistance Act

July 20: Senate Finance Committee Chairman Chuck Grassley (R-IA) officially proposed the next stimulus bill, the American Workers, Families, and Employers Assistance Act, which includes a $1,200 stimulus check for individuals who earn up to $75,000.

Sounds familiar?

It’s because this is the same limit as the stimulus checks provided under the original CARES Act, passed in March that provided a $600 weekly federal unemployment benefit in addition to state unemployment benefits.

This new bill is broken into five titles that cover a wide range of emergency relief acts, including:

  • Expanded Federal Unemployment Benefits
  • Stimulus Checks & Job Creation
  • Healthcare Related Provisions
  • Additional Flexibility And Accountability For Coronavirus Relief Fund Payments And State Tax Certainty For Employees And Employers
  • and more

This new proposal will replace the federal unemployment benefit with a lower weekly rate.

  • Recipients would receive $600 per week ending on or before July 31, 2020
  • Then they would receive $200 per week through October 5th,
  • Starting in October, this payment would be replaced with a payment (up to $500) that, when combined with the state UI payment, would replace 70 percent of lost wages through December 31, 2020.

Some related bills:
S.3638 Coronavirus Relief Fund Flexibility Act
This bill allows Coronavirus Relief Fund payments to be used to replace state, tribal, or local government revenue shortfalls resulting from COVID-19 (i.e., coronavirus disease 2019) during the period from March 1-December 31, 2020.

H.R.7615 To provide a payroll tax credit for certain expenses associated with protecting employees from COVID-19. This bill allows employers a payroll tax credit for 50% of the sum of qualified employee protection expenses, qualified workplace reconfiguration expenses, and qualified workplace technology expenses paid for each calendar quarter.

How Nevada Made Voting Easier During The Pandemic

Nevada Democrats recently passed Assembly Bill 4, making substantial changes to Nevada election law for the 2020 election. The modifications represent a largely fair and reasoned attempt to make sure COVID-19 does not impede the election. Democrats are legitimately concerned about COVID-19 suppressing the vote, and their legislative efforts mirrored their fears.


This action vastly expands the group of people who show up for an election. There was a record turnout with the mostly mail primary election in June. It was 30% turnout, which is the highest it’s been since 1996.


We are less than a hundred days from the November general election. A lot of the clerks are looking for some sort of guidance


Secretary of State Barbara Cegavske, who is Republican, acknowledged in these public hearings that they had not gotten any reports of fraud stemming from this June primary yet made it cear she she wants to return to somewhat normal in the upcoming general election and move away from this mostly mail model.

In an interview at The Rachel Maddow MSNBC, State Sen. Pat Spearman said quote “Republicans don’t think they can win if a lot of people show up to vote, and that trend unfortunately has come to Nevada”

Trump Didn’t Lie About Lying

HuffPost senior White House correspondent S.V. Dáte asked the president during Thursday’s coronavirus task force briefing if, after 3½ years, “do you regret at all all the lying you’ve done to the American people? All the dishonesties?”

Trump paused and then moved on to the next question.

According to a running fact-check database by The Washington Post, Trump has made more than 20,000 false or misleading claims since taking office. Last month, as the tracker passed the shocking milestone, the project’s editor, Glenn Kessler, and fact-check reporters Salvador Rizzo and Meg Kelly wrote, “The notion that Trump would exceed 20,000 claims before he finished his term appeared ludicrous when The Fact Checker started this project during the president’s first 100 days in office.”

According to the database, he reached nearly a thousand false claims about coronavirus alone in just a matter of months.